FALL Arts, Crafts & Bake Sale :: Friday, October 2 from 9am-4pm :: Saturday, October 3 from 9am-3pm :: Hickory Knoll United Methodist Church, Franklin, NC :: CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO!

image image image image
Autumn makes it way down the Cullasaja Gorge

Autumn is trickling down the mountain in the Cullasaja Gorge as leaves begin to change promising a spectacular show.

In the next few months, thousands of tourists will make the drive from Franklin to Highlands to catch a glimpse of the changing leaves.






New brewery expected to open by spring

For the last 15 years Brandon Hintz and his wife Jodi have been vacationing in Macon County and after purchasing a place in Scaly Mountain a year and a half ago, decided to start a business here. With Hintz' experience as a brewer with Sweetwater Brewery in Georgia and after opening a successful brewpub (Hop Alley Brew Pub) in 2013 in Alpharetta, Ga., a business in craft beer seemed like the logical choice.

"Our brewpub in Georgia became a success and I had always wanted to expand into a production brewery at some point," said Hintz. "After discussing different locations we could go to, Franklin was the one spot we kept coming back to both due to the proximity to our place on Scaly as well as the people there. Combine that with the love of craft beer that people have in the western Carolinas coupled with the more attractive beer laws in North Carolina specifically, it was somewhat of a no brainer to open in Franklin."

Teen Challenge of the Smokies ready to make its mark in WNC

“Start by doing what’s necessary, then do what’s possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” – St. Francis of Assisi According to “Pentecostal Evangel” magazine (May 1959 issue), Macon County pastor Fred Sorrells, started with a vision, a dream, a very large portion of faith, and $800 in cash, and set out to build the Assembly of God Camp Cullasaja off Highlands Road. Along with a congregation of folks willing to volunteer and provide labor for the project, the campground was completed for a fraction of its worth, even back then.

The campground became the meeting place for the Western Assembly of God District. In its heyday, it provided a venue for all types of Assembly of God functions, meetings, camps, and the annual church camp meeting.

Pader, 85, hikes the Grand Canyon rim-to-rim

Since John Wesley Powell led the first expedition down the Grand Canyon in 1869, adventure seekers from around the world have flocked to Arizona to gaze into the natural wonder.

Spanning 277 miles in length with the widest point of 18 miles across, it is easy to see why around 5 million people visit the Grand Canyon each year. Last month, a crew from Macon County traveled to the National Park to celebrate James Pader's 85th birthday. Pader was joined by his son, James, and friend Sarah Lowell, to hike the entire Grand Canyon from rim to rim.


Click for Franklin, North Carolina Forecast

Officers of The Scottish Tartan Society are (L-R) Bob James, vice president; Eleanor Swift, president; Dr. Lloyd Swift, games chair; Matt Newsome, chair of the directors of the Scottish Museum; Cathy James, temporary corresponding secretary; Sue Ann McMaster, treasurer; and Bob McMaster, business manager. Not pictured, Chris Morton, secretary and Barbara MacInnis, corresponding secretary. Photo by Abigail JamesThe 17th Annual Burns Night Dinner will be held at Tartan Hall on Saturday, Jan. 19. This supper, with a traditional five course menu, is held world wide on Jan. 25 or as close to the date as possible. This year is the 254th anniversary of Robert Burns’ birth.

Celtic customs are dramatic and colorful and contributed to the politics of Great Britain in the 17th and 18th centuries. After centuries of fighting across the border, the English monarchy conquered the clans of the Scottish Highlands in 1745. Every attempt was made to eradicate Scottish customs. Speaking Gaelic and Olde Scots was forbidden, for example, and schools and businesses were required to use only English. Born a generation after the Battle of Culloden, Robert Burns, a farmer and a poet from Ayrshire in Scotland, wrote down many of the Gaelic folk songs and pub melodies that were almost forgotten. He also set many of his poems to old tunes.

Burns was a handsome, musical young fellow and not a very good farmer. Instead, he became an entertainer in the salons of Edinburgh.

Although he died in his 40s in 1796, he is considered the National Poet of modern Scotland to this day for retaining a rich musical culture that was almost lost. Robert Burns suppers are now held on every continent. It is often asked, “How did a country musician become a worldwide celebrity?” During the 19th century, Great Britain was an imperialist super power. Its military was largely staffed by Scots. Wherever these soldiers were stationed (India, Australia, South Africa, Canada. etc), they loved and taught Burns’ songs around the campfires and in the classrooms until the songs were known universally.

The Burns Night meal incorporates a number of Scottish events including the “Calling Out of the Clans,” a parade of present guests carry their clan banners, form a pattern, a circle or an “x” and call out the name of their district or clan. The Haggis, a meatloaf of liver, other meat and oats is carried at the head of a parade of officials and the “Ode to the Haggis” by Robert Burns is performed in Scots dialect. Arthur Hays, a lawyer from Murphy, does this at the dinner here. Other recitations may include the “Immortal Memory of Robert Burns,” and Scottish songs by local vocalists. This year, an octet from the “Carolines” and “Men Macon Music” will perform. The entertainment is held together with piping by Jean Hayes and music by the “Caledonia Swing Band” from Georgia. Scottish Dancing completes the evening (Elaine and Bob McCollum will be instructing) and concluding with “Auld Lang Syne.”

Burns Night, sponsored by the Friends of the Scottish Tartans Museum, begins at 5:30 p.m. at Tartan Hall on Church Street in Franklin and lasts about three hours. Scottish Dress is optional. Tickets are available at the Scottish Tartans Museum for $38 or $35 if purchased by Jan. 11. For reservations and information, call (828)524-7472 or visit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Macon County News is now on:
Find the Macon County News on Facebook! and Find the Macon County News on twitter!
Facebook   Twitter