HAPPY LABOR DAY! :: Monday, September 1, 2014

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Franklin Daybreak Rotary holds first ever Riverfest

The Rotary Club of Franklin – Daybreak held its inaugural RiverFest event on Saturday, Aug. 23 on the Greenway located in Franklin. The walking and running trail runs alongside the Little Tennessee River.

Visitors gathered for a 5K run that took place early in the morning. That event was followed by a Duck Derby and the event was brought to a close with its “Raft Regatta.” The regatta allowed for participants to build their own rafts for a race down the river.

The Rotary Club of Franklin – Daybreak is an advocate for humanitarian issues in the local community and around the world.

Commissioners in feud over resolution to recognize church’s 100-year anniversary

The Macon County Board of Commissioners seem to pass some sort of a resolution just about every month. A resolution honoring a local boy scout troop; a resolution recognizing a business that kept its doors open for 50 years; a resolution declaring a history week in October. The verbiage of the resolutions are all relatively the same. Whatever entity is being recognized, is named and an explanation is offered on what impact that entity has had on the community at large, and wraps up with the commissioners thanking or recognizing said entity for their accomplishment, whatever that may be.

Parker Meadows on track

Building construction expected to begin in October

Despite a short hiccup in the Parker Meadows Recreation Facility project after finding what is believed to be burial remains, County Manager Derek Roland reported to commissioners Tuesday night that the project is still on time, and within the original budget.

In early July, while grading a portion of the outfield for one of the clover leaf ball fields, what is believed to be a tooth from a Native American burial site was uncovered. The project was temporarily halted and Macon County officials were careful to make sure the project remained in compliance with both the state’s archaeologist office, and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

South Macon boasts Teacher of the Year for the second year

Delaney Holloway decided to venture into the public education field because she strongly believes that every child should have access to a quality education. It is because of that belief and dedication that Holloway has been named the Macon County Teacher of the Year.

“I have said many times that I feel that the level of teachers and personnel in my school and in my county is of the highest quality,” said Holloway. “Having a group of people which I admire so much nominate me for this distinction is humbling. I am so impressed by the skill and dedication I see from my coworkers every day. I am truly so proud to work in the school system in which I do and to call the teachers in this county my colleagues.”

- published 8/21 (Larry) old link: http://www1.cfnc.org/applications/NC_Community_College/apply.html?application_id=1527

Click for Franklin, North Carolina Forecast

Officers of The Scottish Tartan Society are (L-R) Bob James, vice president; Eleanor Swift, president; Dr. Lloyd Swift, games chair; Matt Newsome, chair of the directors of the Scottish Museum; Cathy James, temporary corresponding secretary; Sue Ann McMaster, treasurer; and Bob McMaster, business manager. Not pictured, Chris Morton, secretary and Barbara MacInnis, corresponding secretary. Photo by Abigail JamesThe 17th Annual Burns Night Dinner will be held at Tartan Hall on Saturday, Jan. 19. This supper, with a traditional five course menu, is held world wide on Jan. 25 or as close to the date as possible. This year is the 254th anniversary of Robert Burns’ birth.

Celtic customs are dramatic and colorful and contributed to the politics of Great Britain in the 17th and 18th centuries. After centuries of fighting across the border, the English monarchy conquered the clans of the Scottish Highlands in 1745. Every attempt was made to eradicate Scottish customs. Speaking Gaelic and Olde Scots was forbidden, for example, and schools and businesses were required to use only English. Born a generation after the Battle of Culloden, Robert Burns, a farmer and a poet from Ayrshire in Scotland, wrote down many of the Gaelic folk songs and pub melodies that were almost forgotten. He also set many of his poems to old tunes.

Burns was a handsome, musical young fellow and not a very good farmer. Instead, he became an entertainer in the salons of Edinburgh.

Although he died in his 40s in 1796, he is considered the National Poet of modern Scotland to this day for retaining a rich musical culture that was almost lost. Robert Burns suppers are now held on every continent. It is often asked, “How did a country musician become a worldwide celebrity?” During the 19th century, Great Britain was an imperialist super power. Its military was largely staffed by Scots. Wherever these soldiers were stationed (India, Australia, South Africa, Canada. etc), they loved and taught Burns’ songs around the campfires and in the classrooms until the songs were known universally.

The Burns Night meal incorporates a number of Scottish events including the “Calling Out of the Clans,” a parade of present guests carry their clan banners, form a pattern, a circle or an “x” and call out the name of their district or clan. The Haggis, a meatloaf of liver, other meat and oats is carried at the head of a parade of officials and the “Ode to the Haggis” by Robert Burns is performed in Scots dialect. Arthur Hays, a lawyer from Murphy, does this at the dinner here. Other recitations may include the “Immortal Memory of Robert Burns,” and Scottish songs by local vocalists. This year, an octet from the “Carolines” and “Men Macon Music” will perform. The entertainment is held together with piping by Jean Hayes and music by the “Caledonia Swing Band” from Georgia. Scottish Dancing completes the evening (Elaine and Bob McCollum will be instructing) and concluding with “Auld Lang Syne.”

Burns Night, sponsored by the Friends of the Scottish Tartans Museum, begins at 5:30 p.m. at Tartan Hall on Church Street in Franklin and lasts about three hours. Scottish Dress is optional. Tickets are available at the Scottish Tartans Museum for $38 or $35 if purchased by Jan. 11. For reservations and information, call (828)524-7472 or visit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .





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published: 10/18/2013
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