Live Music Friday, 7/31 at 8pm :: Lazy Hiker Brewing Company presents Brewgrass: New Bridge :: The Yard Opens at 7pm :: click here for more information!

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Shrek the Musical opens to rave reviews

The Overlook Theatre Company’s production of “Shrek the Musical” opened to rave reviews last weekend at the Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts.

Produced by Scotty Corbin, the show features performances by more than 100 cast members with a broadway-quality wardrobe of spectacular costumes.

Pictured are some of the principle characters, from left, Everett Wright as Donkey; Sam Crabtree as Shrek; Nikki Corbin as Princess Fiona; and Scotty Corbin as Prince Farquad.

“Shrek” stages for two more performances, Friday, July 31, and Saturday, Aug. 1, starting at 7 p.m. nightly.

Joint effort results in arrests for meth trafficking

On Friday, July 24, agents of the Appalachian Regional Drug Enforcement Office, the Rabun County Sheriff’s Office, the Macon County, Sheriff’s Office, and the N.C. State Bureau of Investigation took action in an ongoing methamphetamine trafficking investigation.

Agents executed three search warrants in North Carolina which resulted in the seizure of approximately 11.5 ounces of crystal methamphetamine (street value of $32,890).

These arrests were the result of an extensive investigation into methamphetamine trafficking in Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

 

 

Facebook plea for justice yields happy ending for local family

A few days after seeing a bicycle for sale on a Facebook yard sale page that looked remarkably like the one Ann Antes got her seven-year-old son Cameron for Christmas, Ann realized that it was in fact her son's bike. Someone had stolen Cameron's bicycle and sold it for a some quick cash, $20, to be exact.

“Cameron and his dad came inside from attempting to play and Cameron told me his bike was not outside or in the shed,” said Ann. “My husband confirmed it was nowhere to be found. So after thinking on it a few days, I decided to post a small video of him riding it, with this plea:

"So recently my son's bike was stolen. It was posted here and on a few other yard sale sights. If you purchased this bike for the $20 that it was listed for I would gladly give your money back to you for the return of my baby boy's bike. This is all he ever has to do and he is sad it was taken. There is one thing on the bike that will prove it to be ours. Theft is so bad anymore. If there is a decent person left please pm me. Thank you."

For the love of woodworking

For kids at Summer Edventure Camp, Fridays means learning and building in woodworking class. Otto resident Paul Chew is the instructor and has a lifelong affinity for working with wood.

For more than 30 years, Chew has been helping children enjoy woodworking. It began when his church started a program called Nifty Gifty for Christmas. Parents helped children make gifts to give away each Christmas.

“Nifty Gifty challenged me to come up with a new idea each year and to design the projects so even the littlest kids could be successful,” said Chew.

His background in teaching middle and high school industrial arts or “shop” came in handy.

Click for Franklin, North Carolina Forecast

Officers of The Scottish Tartan Society are (L-R) Bob James, vice president; Eleanor Swift, president; Dr. Lloyd Swift, games chair; Matt Newsome, chair of the directors of the Scottish Museum; Cathy James, temporary corresponding secretary; Sue Ann McMaster, treasurer; and Bob McMaster, business manager. Not pictured, Chris Morton, secretary and Barbara MacInnis, corresponding secretary. Photo by Abigail JamesThe 17th Annual Burns Night Dinner will be held at Tartan Hall on Saturday, Jan. 19. This supper, with a traditional five course menu, is held world wide on Jan. 25 or as close to the date as possible. This year is the 254th anniversary of Robert Burns’ birth.

Celtic customs are dramatic and colorful and contributed to the politics of Great Britain in the 17th and 18th centuries. After centuries of fighting across the border, the English monarchy conquered the clans of the Scottish Highlands in 1745. Every attempt was made to eradicate Scottish customs. Speaking Gaelic and Olde Scots was forbidden, for example, and schools and businesses were required to use only English. Born a generation after the Battle of Culloden, Robert Burns, a farmer and a poet from Ayrshire in Scotland, wrote down many of the Gaelic folk songs and pub melodies that were almost forgotten. He also set many of his poems to old tunes.

Burns was a handsome, musical young fellow and not a very good farmer. Instead, he became an entertainer in the salons of Edinburgh.

Although he died in his 40s in 1796, he is considered the National Poet of modern Scotland to this day for retaining a rich musical culture that was almost lost. Robert Burns suppers are now held on every continent. It is often asked, “How did a country musician become a worldwide celebrity?” During the 19th century, Great Britain was an imperialist super power. Its military was largely staffed by Scots. Wherever these soldiers were stationed (India, Australia, South Africa, Canada. etc), they loved and taught Burns’ songs around the campfires and in the classrooms until the songs were known universally.

The Burns Night meal incorporates a number of Scottish events including the “Calling Out of the Clans,” a parade of present guests carry their clan banners, form a pattern, a circle or an “x” and call out the name of their district or clan. The Haggis, a meatloaf of liver, other meat and oats is carried at the head of a parade of officials and the “Ode to the Haggis” by Robert Burns is performed in Scots dialect. Arthur Hays, a lawyer from Murphy, does this at the dinner here. Other recitations may include the “Immortal Memory of Robert Burns,” and Scottish songs by local vocalists. This year, an octet from the “Carolines” and “Men Macon Music” will perform. The entertainment is held together with piping by Jean Hayes and music by the “Caledonia Swing Band” from Georgia. Scottish Dancing completes the evening (Elaine and Bob McCollum will be instructing) and concluding with “Auld Lang Syne.”

Burns Night, sponsored by the Friends of the Scottish Tartans Museum, begins at 5:30 p.m. at Tartan Hall on Church Street in Franklin and lasts about three hours. Scottish Dress is optional. Tickets are available at the Scottish Tartans Museum for $38 or $35 if purchased by Jan. 11. For reservations and information, call (828)524-7472 or visit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .





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