25th Annual Leaf Lookers GEMBOREE :: Friday, October 17 - Sunday, October 19 at the Macon County Community Building

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Quick action saves local woman after her car rolled into a creek

On Tuesday afternoon during heavy rainfall, a 2008 Honda Civic driven by local woman Erin Moffitt was traveling on Rabbit Creek Road when it went off the road and into Rabbit Creek.

Gabriel Bolick and Darren Worley called 911, and along with the help of Jeff Paris, were able to get the door of the car open and get Moffitt to safety. Franklin Fire and Rescue arrived shortly thereafter and transported Moffitt up the steep embankment.

According to N.C. Highway Patrolman Clay Cogdill, Moffitt was immediately rushed to Mission Hospital in Asheville. She has since been released in what is considered a positive outcome for what could have been a grim situation.

Election profiles: District Attorney candidates

Editor’s Note: This is the last of the candidate profiles for the 2014 midterm election. Early voting begins Oct. 23.

Both candidates vying for the open 30th Judicial District Attorney seat have more than a decade of experience each as assistant district attorneys under the current DA Mike Bonfoey and are ready to face the challenges in representing Western North Carolina.

“Prosecutors in this district spend a lot of time in the car traveling from county to county because of the vastness of our district,” said Macon County resident and DA candidate Ashley Welch. “Some districts in the state only include one county. Several others are made up of two or three counties. With seven counties, this district is one of the largest in the state…

Officials say Parker Meadows right on track

Despite a few bumps in the road, Macon County’s Parker Meadows Recreation Complex is on track, and currently $21,000 under budget.

County Manager Derek Roland updated commissioners during the October board meeting Tuesday night, informing them that weather permitting, all grading on the project should be wrapped up in the next two weeks allowing for building construction to begin on Nov. 1.

“Everything is moving along great,” said Roland. “If things continue the way things are going and weather permitting, if the people who are working on this project have anything to do with it, we will be knocking the doors down come Spring.”

School kids learn about the art of puppeteering

Red Herring Puppeteer conducts workshop at East Franklin

Lisa Sturz with Red Herring Puppets held a workshop at East Franklin School on Tuesday.

Kayla Schulte’s kindergarten class learned how to make shadow puppets. They traced Halloween shapes, cut them out, added color and a stick. After they had made their puppets, the kids put on a puppet show.

The award-winning Red Herring Puppets will present “The Big Dipper: Calendar, Compass & Clock,” on Tuesday, Oct. 21, 7 p.m., in the Franklin High School Fine Arts Center. The performance will include more than two dozen beautifully crafted marionettes and twice as many shadow images.

- published 8/21 (Larry) old link: http://www1.cfnc.org/applications/NC_Community_College/apply.html?application_id=1527

Click for Franklin, North Carolina Forecast

Officers of The Scottish Tartan Society are (L-R) Bob James, vice president; Eleanor Swift, president; Dr. Lloyd Swift, games chair; Matt Newsome, chair of the directors of the Scottish Museum; Cathy James, temporary corresponding secretary; Sue Ann McMaster, treasurer; and Bob McMaster, business manager. Not pictured, Chris Morton, secretary and Barbara MacInnis, corresponding secretary. Photo by Abigail JamesThe 17th Annual Burns Night Dinner will be held at Tartan Hall on Saturday, Jan. 19. This supper, with a traditional five course menu, is held world wide on Jan. 25 or as close to the date as possible. This year is the 254th anniversary of Robert Burns’ birth.

Celtic customs are dramatic and colorful and contributed to the politics of Great Britain in the 17th and 18th centuries. After centuries of fighting across the border, the English monarchy conquered the clans of the Scottish Highlands in 1745. Every attempt was made to eradicate Scottish customs. Speaking Gaelic and Olde Scots was forbidden, for example, and schools and businesses were required to use only English. Born a generation after the Battle of Culloden, Robert Burns, a farmer and a poet from Ayrshire in Scotland, wrote down many of the Gaelic folk songs and pub melodies that were almost forgotten. He also set many of his poems to old tunes.

Burns was a handsome, musical young fellow and not a very good farmer. Instead, he became an entertainer in the salons of Edinburgh.

Although he died in his 40s in 1796, he is considered the National Poet of modern Scotland to this day for retaining a rich musical culture that was almost lost. Robert Burns suppers are now held on every continent. It is often asked, “How did a country musician become a worldwide celebrity?” During the 19th century, Great Britain was an imperialist super power. Its military was largely staffed by Scots. Wherever these soldiers were stationed (India, Australia, South Africa, Canada. etc), they loved and taught Burns’ songs around the campfires and in the classrooms until the songs were known universally.

The Burns Night meal incorporates a number of Scottish events including the “Calling Out of the Clans,” a parade of present guests carry their clan banners, form a pattern, a circle or an “x” and call out the name of their district or clan. The Haggis, a meatloaf of liver, other meat and oats is carried at the head of a parade of officials and the “Ode to the Haggis” by Robert Burns is performed in Scots dialect. Arthur Hays, a lawyer from Murphy, does this at the dinner here. Other recitations may include the “Immortal Memory of Robert Burns,” and Scottish songs by local vocalists. This year, an octet from the “Carolines” and “Men Macon Music” will perform. The entertainment is held together with piping by Jean Hayes and music by the “Caledonia Swing Band” from Georgia. Scottish Dancing completes the evening (Elaine and Bob McCollum will be instructing) and concluding with “Auld Lang Syne.”

Burns Night, sponsored by the Friends of the Scottish Tartans Museum, begins at 5:30 p.m. at Tartan Hall on Church Street in Franklin and lasts about three hours. Scottish Dress is optional. Tickets are available at the Scottish Tartans Museum for $38 or $35 if purchased by Jan. 11. For reservations and information, call (828)524-7472 or visit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .





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