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Features Health & Wellness

Gentris Corporation (www.gentris.com).a global leader in pharmacogenomics and biorepository solutions, has announced that Amelia Wall Warner, PharmD has joined the company as its new president. Dr. Warner will oversee the U.S. operations, lead the development of new service offerings, and develop scientific education and training programs for biobanking and pharmacogenomics. As a key member of the management team, she will work with Gentris leaders to set the strategic vision for the company and ensure it continues to be on the cuttingedge of genomic medicine.

“I am thrilled to have the opportunity to join the executive management team of Gentris, a company with profound impact on the understanding of the genetic basis for variation in drug response,” said Amelia Wall Warner, Gentris President.


Each year Drake Enterprises sponsors a Red Cross Blood Drive. The drive was held on Tuesday, July 9, at PRemiere Marketing, 261 East Palmer Street, Franklin. Drake employees donated 48 units of productive blood.

Pictured (L-R) are Tammy Nelson, Drake Software; Carolyn Deal, American Red Cross Supervisor; and Erica Hall, PRemiere Marketing.


More than 100 consumers have complained to the North Carolina Attorney General’s office in the past month about calls pitching a medical alert system.

These robocalls (pre-recorded, automatically dialed calls) use what is called an avatar recording, meaning the recording can understand some of what you say and respond with a stock answer. In the recording, “John” promises you a medical alert system and says it’s already been paid for.

While this may sound like a good deal, AG Roy Cooper suspects it’s either a ruse to steal your money or to bill your health insurance provider for a device you may not want or need.


Will help them keep producing their own insulin

Adding foods rich in specific amino and fatty acids to the diets of youth with Type 1 diabetes kept them producing some of their own insulin for up to two years after diagnosis, said researchers at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The youth still required supplemental insulin, but they may have reduced risk of diabetes complications by continuing to produce some of their own insulin, said Elizabeth Mayer-Davis, professor of nutrition at Gillings and medicine at UNC’s School of Medicine, who led the study of more than 1,300 youth. “This also opens the door for a new approach that could really benefit the lives of these children.”


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