- published 3/27 (Larry) - unpublished ?

Click for Franklin, North Carolina Forecast

Opinion Letters Each one read one: Change attitudes, change lives

In an effort to decrease stigma associated with mental illness, the U. S. Congress established the first week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW). This is an opportunity to learn about serious mental illness such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and PTSD. The U.S. Surgeon General has reported that stigma is a major barrier to people seeking help when they need it. That’s why MIAW is so important. We want people to understand mental illness. The more people know, the better they can help themselves or help their loved one get the treatment and support they need.

Our Macon County public libraries will have a display of books and videos relating to many aspects of mental illness, along with brochures and information provided by NAMI Appalachian South, our local affiliate of NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness). Books Unlimited on Main St., Franklin will have a selection of books for purchase.

In an effort to decrease stigma associated with mental illness, the U. S. Congress established the first week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW). This is an opportunity to learn about serious mental illness such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and PTSD. The U.S. Surgeon General has reported that stigma is a major barrier to people seeking help when they need it. That’s why MIAW is so important. We want people to understand mental illness. The more people know, the better they can help themselves or help their loved one get the treatment and support they need.

Our Macon County public libraries will have a display of books and videos relating to many aspects of mental illness, along with brochures and information provided by NAMI Appalachian South, our local affiliate of NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness). Books Unlimited on Main St., Franklin will have a selection of books for purchase. NAMI urges that “each one read one” during this time. Mental illness is a medical illness — it does not discriminate. One in four adults experiences a mental health problem in any given year. One in 17 adults lives with a serious mental illness. Many of our troops returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan, or from previous combat experiences have “hidden wounds” and must not be forgotten. The important things to remember are: Treatment works. Recovery is possible. There is hope. Progress is being made.

During MIAW, talk with friends and neighbors about mental illness and recovery. This is an opportunity to learn facts and end myths in order to break the stigma and silence that too often surrounds this topic. By educating ourselves, we can change attitudes about mental illness; we can change lives.

Ann Nandrea, President NAMI Appalachian South





Share
published: 10/18/2013
Macon County News is now on:
Find the Macon County News on Facebook! and Find the Macon County News on twitter!
Facebook   Twitter