HAPPY LABOR DAY! :: Monday, September 1, 2014

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Franklin Daybreak Rotary holds first ever Riverfest

The Rotary Club of Franklin – Daybreak held its inaugural RiverFest event on Saturday, Aug. 23 on the Greenway located in Franklin. The walking and running trail runs alongside the Little Tennessee River.

Visitors gathered for a 5K run that took place early in the morning. That event was followed by a Duck Derby and the event was brought to a close with its “Raft Regatta.” The regatta allowed for participants to build their own rafts for a race down the river.

The Rotary Club of Franklin – Daybreak is an advocate for humanitarian issues in the local community and around the world.

Commissioners in feud over resolution to recognize church’s 100-year anniversary

The Macon County Board of Commissioners seem to pass some sort of a resolution just about every month. A resolution honoring a local boy scout troop; a resolution recognizing a business that kept its doors open for 50 years; a resolution declaring a history week in October. The verbiage of the resolutions are all relatively the same. Whatever entity is being recognized, is named and an explanation is offered on what impact that entity has had on the community at large, and wraps up with the commissioners thanking or recognizing said entity for their accomplishment, whatever that may be.

Parker Meadows on track

Building construction expected to begin in October

Despite a short hiccup in the Parker Meadows Recreation Facility project after finding what is believed to be burial remains, County Manager Derek Roland reported to commissioners Tuesday night that the project is still on time, and within the original budget.

In early July, while grading a portion of the outfield for one of the clover leaf ball fields, what is believed to be a tooth from a Native American burial site was uncovered. The project was temporarily halted and Macon County officials were careful to make sure the project remained in compliance with both the state’s archaeologist office, and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

South Macon boasts Teacher of the Year for the second year

Delaney Holloway decided to venture into the public education field because she strongly believes that every child should have access to a quality education. It is because of that belief and dedication that Holloway has been named the Macon County Teacher of the Year.

“I have said many times that I feel that the level of teachers and personnel in my school and in my county is of the highest quality,” said Holloway. “Having a group of people which I admire so much nominate me for this distinction is humbling. I am so impressed by the skill and dedication I see from my coworkers every day. I am truly so proud to work in the school system in which I do and to call the teachers in this county my colleagues.”

- published 8/21 (Larry) old link: http://www1.cfnc.org/applications/NC_Community_College/apply.html?application_id=1527

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Roy Owenby will talk about his book “The Owl Knows” Tuesday, June 25, at 7 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library.Local author Roy Owenby will present a talk about his novel “The Owl Knows” on Tuesday, June 25, at 7 p.m., in the Community Room of the Jackson County Public Library Complex. This program is free of charge.

“The Owl Knows” is an Appalachian Trail mystery set in Macon County. Two female teachers are hiking the Trail, when one is murdered and the other mysteriously disappears. The plot thickens as local law enforcement, aided by the FBI, begin to unravel the mystery.

Author Roy Owenby, was born in Nantahala. A Navy veteran, he graduated from Appalachian State University at age 40.

Local author Roy Owenby will present a talk about his novel “The Owl Knows” on Tuesday, June 25, at 7 p.m., in the Community Room of the Jackson County Public Library Complex. This program is free of charge.

“The Owl Knows” is an Appalachian Trail mystery set in Macon County. Two female teachers are hiking the Trail, when one is murdered and the other mysteriously disappears. The plot thickens as local law enforcement, aided by the FBI, begin to unravel the mystery.

Author Roy Owenby, was born in Nantahala. A Navy veteran, he graduated from Appalachian State University at age 40. After 35 years in various supervisory and management positions, he currently works part-time for the N.C. Department of Commerce. He has traveled extensively throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, Israel and Europe. He is a featured writer for the Burningtown News, an online newspaper. He has written more than 200 short stories, many of which will be featured in an upcoming book entitled “Taters, Corn Shellers and Lard Buckets,” a caricature of Southern Appalachian life.

This event is co-sponsored by the Friends of the Jackson County Public Library. For more information, call the JCPL at (828)586-2016.





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published: 10/18/2013
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